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Butter Churn
In cool weather, cream rose to the top of the milk pan. Cream was skimmed from the top, placed in a butter churn, and stirred energetically until it became solid butter. This work was done mostly by women.
Tea Spoon Set
Not all awards were in the form of ribbons and medals. This set of tea spoons was won by Amy Dunham in 1817, at the first Otsego County Fair. She was awarded the set of spoons for a “double damask tablecloth,” which she had woven. Made of silver, the spoon handles are engraved with her initials, A.D.
Milk Bottle
The milk produced at Fenimore Farm had one of three destinations. Some was bottled and sold locally and regionally, while other milk was bottled and shipped by rail to The Dakota, an upscale apartment building in Manhattan that Edward Severin Clark owned. The rest of the milk was sold in bulk to larger dairy producers.
Flail
Threshing (also known as thrashing), refers to the method of separating grain from its outer hull, called chaff. Until the mid-nineteenth century, the farmer usually threshed by hand, swinging a flail against the grain on the barn floor to open the grain. The introduction of steam and animal-powered machinery in the mid to late nineteenth century, brought convenience to … Continue reading Flail
Engraving of an adjustable switch real rake patented in 1865.
Adjustable Switch Reel Rake – Patented 1865
Patented in 1865, the adjustable switch reel rake was intended to make reaping grain more efficient for farmers. Although some farmers used steampowered machines by the 1860’s, many still used horses or oxen to power the equipment on their farms.  
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