Brooks Granary

Brooks Grainery

The granary came from the same farm as the Brooks Barn and was built by the Mayhew family in the early nineteenth century. It was used to store processed grain including oats, barley, wheat, and rye. The walls are slanted to keep out rainwater dripping down from the roof, and the building is raised on piers to allow air circulation. The large stone caps on the piers, as well as the detached steps, were designed to keep out rodents.

Built on stones to protect it from pests, the Brooks Grainery is a safe place to store crops away for later use.

Crops

Farm families raised crops as food for themselves, to feed their animals, and to sell at market.

Common crops in central New York in the mid nineteenth century included corn, wheat, barley, and oats. Crops such as these required large work animals for power and a great deal of strength. Because of this, the management of the fields fell largely on the men.

The family would also keep a large kitchen garden.  This garden fed the family all summer and much of it was preserved for the winter.  The kitchen garden was largely tended by women and children. They would plant and harvest fresh greens, garlic, onions, turnips, potatoes, carrots, and various types of squash.

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